MS in Clinical & Translational Science

MS in Clinical & Translational Science

This program is sponsored by the multi-institutional Clinical & Translational Science Institute and leads to a Master of Science Degree in Clinical and Translational Science. The program is designed to meet the translational research training needs of health care professionals, clinical investigators, research scientists and individuals working in biomedical industries. It is open to students with or without advanced academic degrees. All students complete a foundational curriculum focused on translational research, study designs, clinical trials, biostatistics and bioethics.

Course Emphases

Additional courses emphasize the following concentrations:

  • Epidemiology and Outcomes Research

    These courses focus on training individuals who will conduct population-based and clinical outcomes research.

  • Translational Research

    Courses will emphasize “bench to bedside” research. The courses will focus on training individuals who wish to bridge the research gap between basic and clinical research (e.g. drug development, genetics research, use of animal models). Trainees include both basic scientists who wish to take their work toward clinical application and clinical scientists who wish to investigate the science underlying clinical observations with the goal of developing new understandings or treatments.

  • Commercial Development

    Courses will emphasize the commercialization and regulatory compliance for various classes of therapeutics and diagnostics. This area of emphasis utilizes some existing courses offered in the Healthcare Technologies Program and Bioinformatics Programs.

FAQ

I am a healthcare professional who would like to be able to carry out translational or clinical research. How can I efficiently get the additional training I need?
We have a program designed for people just like you. The Medical College of Wisconsin recently formed a Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) to bring together the educational, research and clinical assets of the Medical College, Marquette University, the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, and the Milwaukee School of Engineering. The CTSI offers a new program in which students can earn a Certificate and/or MS degree in Clinical and Translational Science.

Are people who are not health-care professionals eligible to enroll in the program?
Yes, the program accommodates students from diverse backgrounds, who hold an undergraduate degree. Students with undergraduate degrees will find that the MS degree is an excellent foundation for their involvement in clinical research, employment by industry or voluntary agencies, fellowships with government agencies or entrance into doctoral programs.

What does the program involve? Can I fit it into my existing work schedule?
The program is designed to accommodate the schedule of fully-employed individuals. Most classes are scheduled for the afternoon and evening of the same day each week. A few classes are even offered on-line. If your work schedule will accommodate your being away one afternoon and evening per week, all required coursework can be completed.

The MS degree requires a total of 30 credits, Several foundational courses are required of all students and include: Introduction to Translational Research, Introduction to Epidemiology, Biostatistics, Clinical Trial Design, and Ethics and Integrity in Science. Additional credits are earned in elective courses selected with the help of an academic advisor. The elective course curriculum is tailored to meet the specific interests and needs of each individual student. All students also complete a 6-credit Masters Project.

Are there specific areas of focus within the program?
Yes. We refer to them as concentrations, but one of the strengths of the program is that it allows great flexibility in designing a curriculum that addresses each student’s specific interests and needs. The official concentrations within the program are (i) Clinical Epidemiology & Outcomes Research, (ii) Commercial Development, (iii) Translational Research.

The Clinical Epidemiology concentration will be of interest to those interested in the epidemiology of diseases, design of clinical research studies and outcomes research. The Commercial Development concentration is intended for students interested in getting the fruits of clinical and translational research into the market. Elective courses for this concentration include business courses offered by Marquette University. Finally, the Translational Research concentration emphasizes the training and skills needed to advance basic science discoveries into clinical applications.

Can I enroll now?
The application deadlines follow.

Fall: July 1st
Spring: November 1st
Summer: April 1st

Application Information

Academic Qualifications of Students

Applicants for admission must have at least an undergraduate degree from an accredited institution, with some previous coursework in science or mathematics. Applicants complete an online application, submit transcripts from all previously attended academic institutions, and submit 3 letters of reference.

A grade point average of 3.0 or better is usually required. Completion of the Graduate Records Examination is required unless the applicant holds a terminal degree (e.g. MD, PhD, DVM, DDS, etc.).

International students must have a minimum TOEFL score of 250 on the computer-based version or a score of 600 on the paper-based version, or a score of 100 on the internet version (per Graduate School rutes, the TOEFL exam requirement is waived for certain students completing their previous education in English-speaking countries).

Applicants are considered for admission on an individual basis and previous experience will be taken into account.

How to Apply

  • Visit: www.mcw.edu/Graduate-School.htm
  • Click on “Apply” tab at top of page
  • Click the “Apply Now!” button
  • Create an account and complete the online application

Application Deadlines

Fall: July 1st
Spring: November 1st
Summer: April 1st

Program Completion Process

Forms

Please visit the following link to the Graduate School site to find all pertinent forms. http://www.mcw.edu/Graduate-School/Current-Students.htm#forms

Note: Students should submit all forms to the MS in CTS Program.

Program Completion Process (Adopted from the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences Student and Faculty Handbook)

  • Identify a Thesis Advisor and 2-3 additional committee members
    One of these individuals will be a biostatistician which is assigned to you by the MS in CTS Program if you do not indicate that you would like to work with a specific biostatistician.
  • Complete and submit the “Committee Approval” form to the MS in CTS Program
    (Must complete and submit these forms before beginning thesis project)
    (Must submit CVs for all committee members who do not currently have a Graduate School Faculty Appointment)
  • Complete and submit the “Outline Approval” form to the MS in CTS Program
    Submit a copy of the outline with the completed form.
    (Must complete and submit this form before beginning thesis project)
  • Compete and submit “Intent to Graduate” form to the MS in CTS Program or online
  • Submit final copies of thesis/Binding form with the following:

  • Confidential Report
  • Degree of Application Form
  • Signature page (include extra paper equaling the number of copies to be bound)
  • One copy of final thesis on CD (PDF)
  • One electronic copy of thesis
  • Pay graduation and thesis fee
  • Submit picture for commencement program
  • Obtain signature from librarian indicating no money is owed
  • Complete and submit “Post Graduate Student Information” form
  • Complete insurance forms (if applicable)
  • Turn in MCW ID card (if applicable)

*Paperwork requires the signature of your thesis advisor and all committee members.

Program Graduation/ Program Completion Checklist

  • Complete and submit Intent to Graduate to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (December 1st for Winter and Spring graduates; August 1st for Summer graduates)
  • Submit electronic copy of final thesis to the MS in CTS Program (email to Memory Bacon – Email)
  • Submit final hard copies of thesis to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • For specific details about thesis organization, type of paper (20 pound), and binding criteria, visit mcw.edu/graduateschool.htm
  • Complete and submit final thesis on CD (PDF) to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Complete and submit Binding Form to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Complete and submit Degree of Application Form to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Submit copy of signature page to the MS in CTS Program (e-mail to jkusch@mcw.edu)
  • Submit original signature page to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences (include extra paper equaling the number of extra copies of thesis to be bound)
  • Pay graduation and thesis fee to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Submit photograph suitable for Commencement Program—Due 2 months before intended graduate date
  • Obtain signature from librarian indicating no money is owed
  • Complete and submit “Post Graduate Student Information” form to Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
  • Complete insurance forms to end or extend coverage (if applicable)
  • Turn in MCW ID card (not applicable for MCW employees)

Questions

For questions regarding program and form completion, please contact:

Christine Schaefer
Medical College of Wisconsin
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
Email

Angela Backus
Medical College of Wisconsin
Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences
(414) 955-5670 / Email

Curriculum

Courses by Semester

To accommodate the schedules of fully employed individuals, most classes are held on a single day of the week. In addition, some courses will be held in the evenings. The program normally requires 2 years to complete, but up to 4 years is allowed. Most classes will be held on the MCW campus.

Contact course instructor for current textbook list.

Curriculum

Thirty (30) credits are required for graduation. Several areas of concentration are provided that are intended to accommodate students with different backgrounds and professional interests. However, each student will have an individualized educational program comprised of foundational courses required of all students, elective courses selected as appropriate for the student’s interest, and a master’s thesis project completed under the mentorship of a three-member multidisciplinary faculty mentoring committee (6 credits).

Students should be able to complete the program in 2 years, but are allowed up to 4 years. The curriculum for each student will be tailored to meet the individual needs and interests of the student. Thus, the elective courses selected by a student may cut across the boundaries of the concentrations.

  • A total of six (6) Thesis credits are required to graduate. These credits may be spread out over several semesters during the program.
  • Students are required to complete four (4) semesters of Graduate Seminar.

Fall

  • Biostatistics 1 (3 credits)*
  • Clinical Research Methods Workshop (1 credit)
  • Clinical Trial Design (1 credit)*
  • Intro to Clinical & Translational Research (1 credit)*
  • Introduction to Epidemiology (2 or 3 credits)*
  • Leadership in Academic Healthcare (1 credit)
  • Leadership in Academic Healthcare III (1 credit)
  • Master’s Thesis (.5-6 credits)*
  • Readings and Research (.5-3 credits)
  • Graduate Seminar (.5 credits)*
  • Translational Genetics (2 credits)

*Required Course

Additional Electives
  • Accounting Foundations (2 credits)
  • Entrepreneurial Finance (3 credits)
  • Financial Management (3 credits)
  • Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
  • New Venture Formation (1-3 credits)
  • Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
  • Survey of Biomedical Engineering (3 credits)

Spring

  • Models of Disease and Drug Discovery (1 credit)
  • Biostatistics II (3 credits)
  • Ethics & Integrity in Science (1 credit)*
  • Fundamentals of Intellectual Property (1 credit)
  • Graduate Seminar (.5 credits)*
  • Leadership in Academic Healthcare II (1 credit)
  • Leadership in Academic Healthcare IV (1 credit)
  • Meta Analysis (1 credit)
  • Master’s Thesis (.5-6 credits)
  • Patient Safety and Safety Science (1 credit)
  • Readings and Research (.5-3 credits)
  • Research Methods in Epidemiology (3 credits)

*Required Course

Additional Electives
  • Accounting Foundations (2 credits)
  • Biomedical Technology Assessment (3 credits)
  • Environment of Healthcare Delivery (2 credits)
  • Financial Management (3 credits)
  • Growth Strategies for Entrepreneurial Companies (3 credits)
  • Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
  • Marketing Management (3 credits)
  • Organizational Behavior (3 credits)

Summer

  • Biomedical Technology Standards and Regulations (2 credits)
  • Clinical Trial Design (1 credit)*
  • Ethics and Integrity in Science (1 credit)*
  • Ethics of Technology Utilization (1 credit)
  • Master’s Thesis (.5-6 credits)
  • Methods in Grant Preparation (1 credit)
  • Readings and Research (.5-3 credits)

*Required Course

Additional Electives
  • Accounting Foundations (2 credits)
  • Entrepreneurial Finance (3 credits)
  • Financial Management (3 credits)
  • Managerial Accounting (3 credits)
  • Organizational Behavior (3 credits)
  • Product Development of Medical Devices (2 credits)

17 kBDownload the Program Planning Template

Textbooks

Contact course instructor for current textbook list.

Foundational Courses

Foundational Courses

IDCourse Name / DescriptionCreditsOffered
20150Introduction to Epidemiology
This course will provide a general understanding of the epidemiological approach to the study of disease. This course is open to all students enrolled in the Graduate School and to other qualified students with permission of the instructor.
2-3Fall
20261Clinical Trials Design
Offered each Summer Semester
This course is intended to introduce students to clinical trials methodology and to assist those who wish to evaluate and interpret published reports of trials. This course is focused on the design and development phases of the clinical trials, recruitment techniques, data collection and data quality issues, assessment of adverse effects, participant adherence, data monitoring, sample size requirements, techniques of survival analysis, reporting and interpretation of results, and multi-site studies.
1Summer
20301Graduate Seminar
(4 semesters required for MS in CTS students)
This two-year seminar series is designed to provide students with opportunities to learn about the clinical outcomes, epidemiologic, and clinical translational research that is being conducted at the Medical College and its partnering institutions. It provides opportunities for students to network with experienced investigators and provides a forum in which to share and discuss research ideas.
.5Fall, Spring
20100Introduction to Clinical and Translational Research
This course provides an overview of the rationale, process and methodologies of clinical and translational research. The scope of the course is broad and includes basic science discovery, animal studies, drug and device preclinical and clinical development, outcomes research, and epidemiology. The course will utilize case studies that illustrate translational research and will be interactive in format. Instructors will be drawn from both basic science and clinical departments.
1Fall
04200Biostatistics I
This is an introductory course in biostatistical methods for non-biostatistics majors. Topics include elementary probability, sampling, point and interval estimation and hypothesis testing.
3Fall
10222Ethics and Integrity in Science
This course provides the basis for understanding the ethical issues related to basic scientific and medical research, including animal and human subject research, fraud and misconduct, and governmental, institutional, and researcher responsibilities.
1Fall, Spring, Online
20299Master’s Thesis
*Total of 6 credits are required. Thesis credits may be split up over several semesters.

All students will complete a master’s thesis describing a translational or clinical research project in which he or she participated in both the design and execution. The Committee will be comprised of a thesis mentor and two additional faculty members (one of whom is a biostatistician). The Committee will approve the project in advance, provide guidance and supervision of the project, and will critique and, if appropriate, approve the thesis.
6*Fall, Spring, Summer
Electives

Non-Concentration Specific Elective Courses for CTS Program Students

 20255A Clinical Research Methods Workshop* – 1 credit

Offered Each Fall Semester

*Strongly Recommended for 2nd Year MS in Clinical and Translational Science Students who will develop a project for which they will need to compose an IRB protocol.

This course is intended to teach clinical fellows and junior faulty an approach to designing epidemiologic research studies.

There are three potential levels of credit available to course participants.

  • Course credit towards a Graduate School degree ($1050): If you are interested in pursuing a Master’s degree in Clinical Translational Science, you will need to apply for admission to the Graduate School as a degree seeking student prior to July 1st at http://www.mcw.edu/Graduate-School.htm. The application fee is $50. Tuition for the course registration is $1000. If you do not register with the Graduate School by July 31st, you may be subjected to a $250 late fee. Proof of course credit will appear on a transcript forever available through the Graduate School at MCW. A grade will be assigned for all students in this category.
  • Audit course via the Graduate School ($150): If you are interested in proof of course credit via a transcript forever available from the Graduate School at MCW but do not wish to be graded, you may audit the course by applying for admission to the Graduate School as a non-degree seeker at http://www.mcw.edu/Graduate-School.htm
  • The application fee is $50 and application for admission should be made to the Graduate School prior to July 1st. If you do not register with the Graduate School by July 31st, you may be subjected to a $250 late fee. The audit fee is $100.
  • Certificate (free): Registration for the course is satisfied by the completion and submission of the Clinical Research Methods Workshop Enrollment Contract. No additional registration in the graduate school is required. No grade will be assigned. At the end of the course, students who attended classes regularly and completed all course assignments will be given a “certificate of completion” signed by the course director. This will be the only proof they have that they successfully completed the course. The Graduate School will not be able to supply proof at a later time. This may be adequate for fellows in clinical departments who may need to take this course as part of their fellowship, but for whom “official credit” is not required.

95 kBFall 2016 Clinical Research Methods Workshop Enrollment ContractContract not required for students already admitted to the MS in Clinical & Translational Science Program who enroll in course for academic credit.


IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
20105BIntroduction to Community Engagement: Principles of Community
NEW ONLINE COURSE – BEGINS IN FALL 2012

This course is an introduction to the concepts, theories and principles in community engagement (CE) and community engagement in research (CEnR), with an emphasis on community/academic partnerships. It will examine the methods and strategies of CEnR including partnership development, capacity building, project planning, communication, dissemination, evaluation and ethical practices. The course objectives are: define key terms and principles used in CEnR; identify steps of partnership development in CEnR; recognize and apply ethical practices in CEnR; explain strategies and methods of CEnR including capacity building, project planning, communication and dissemination; demonstrate an understanding of common challenges in CEnR; describe how to formulate research questions for CEnR; and describe common evaluation methods and models used in community engaged programs. This course provides basic scientists, clinical researchers and other health practitioners an introduction to community engagement principles and offers the necessary foundation for translating research into practice.
20140A Leadership in Academic Health Care I: Communication & Leadership
Offered every Odd Fall Semester
This course is a biweekly seminar that consists of didactic and small group discussions around central readings to prepare students to assume leadership roles in academics and the health professions. The overall course, offered in four independent modules over two years, applies a broad theoretical base in leadership, communication and planned change to promote effectiveness in students’ future roles as academic physicians. The course is designed for academic fellows and other students aimed at entering academic careers, particularly in patient-oriented research. This module focuses on general leadership issues, interpersonal communication and effectiveness in small-group settings.
1
20141A Leadership in Academic Health Care II: Organizations & Change
Offered every Even Spring Semester
Continuation of Leadership in Academic Health Care I. This module focuses on the roles of academic health centers, organizational behavior and strategies for promoting change.
1
20142A Leadership in Academic Health Care III: Leadership & Personal Effectiveness
Offered every Even Fall Semester
Continuation of Leadership in Academic Health Care I. This module focuses on general leadership issues, time management and academic roles, building effective teams and problem-solving strategies.
1
20143A Leadership in Academic Health Care IV: Academic Advancement
Offered every Odd Spring Semester
Continuation of Leadership in Academic Health Care I. This module focuses on identifying one’s own leadership style, characteristics of productive research environments, promotion and tenure, interviewing and negotiating skills.
1
20242 Models of Disease and Drug Discovery
Offered each Spring Semester
This course covers the concepts involved in developing disease models in the laboratory, and using these model systems to identify candidate drugs that will eventually be developed for therapy in the clinic. Topics covered include current stem cell culture and animal models used to study human diseases, computational screening approaches for designing and identifying small molecules in drug discovery, and the steps involved in taking a drug from the bench to the clinic. Specifically, models for human disease ranging from stem cells to small animal (zebrafish) to large animal (sheep) for biomedical research will be discussed. Course material will cover techniques for drug screening, platforms developed by companies and academics to screen drugs and steps involved in the drug discovery process. It is anticipated that advantages and disadvantages of each model system will be discussed followed by the practical aspects of designing screens for small molecules using these model systems. At the end of the 9 weeks duration of the course, each student is expected to prepare a report that will outline the logical progression of identifying a small molecule against a target of student’s interest, and to make it a commercial drug for clinical use.
1
20253 Methods in Grant Preparation
Offered each Summer Semester
The purpose and goal of this course is to present advanced principles of National Institutes of Health (NIH) grant preparation. Topics to be covered will include: Writing with a purpose and intent; writing statements of innovation and significance; research design; and translational research. The course will also address how to succinctly state overall and specific hypotheses and specific aims with affirmation and relevance. The course will suggest specific writing styles with the intent of clearly stating the importance of the specific aims, and bringing them to fruition and purpose. Special attention will be placed on how to write in a manner which presents proposal aims in an important and timely manner. The course will stress writing styles which relate distinct importance and purpose in a manner which relates novelty in the experimental design. Most of the course will cover the 12 page RO1 application. However, some time will also be devoted to other specific types of awards (i.e., mentored K awards, training grants, and programmatic initiatives). This course is recommended for individuals who have already located funding resources and are currently working on one or more grant proposals.
1
20263 Meta Analysis
Offered each Spring Semester
This course is designed to provide learners with the tools to critically appraise and independently conduct studies using meta-analytic methods. The specific course objectives are to (1) identify the strengths and weaknesses of meta-analysis and when the method is appropriate; (2) utilize the steps of meta-analysis, including question definition, literature review, data abstraction, analysis and publication; and (3) identify the theory and statistical methods of meta-analysis including fixed and random effects models, tests of heterogeneity, publication bias, file drawer tests, and sensitivity analysis.
1
20295 Reading and Research
Offered every Summer, Fall, and Spring Semester
This independent study course is available to all Master’s degree-seeking students, and awards credit for pursuing background reading and new research in areas of particular student interest, under the guidance of a program approved Readings and Research Advisor.
103 kBReading and Research Course Information Form
1-3

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Electives for Concentration in Epidemiology and Outcomes Research
IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
04201Biostatistics II
Strongly Recommended
Offered each Spring Semester

Continuation of Biostatistics I. Topics include statistical methods for categorical data, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.
3
20256Research Methods in Epidemiology
Offered each Spring Semester
This course covers the fundamental concepts of types of study designs, data collection methods and data analyses in epidemiology. Cohort and case-control study designs will be presented in depth with a review of the methods used to address bias and confounding items in the context of these designs. Recent developments in methods for epidemiological research will also be considered.
3

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Electives for Concentration in Translational Research
IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
04201Biostatistics II
Strongly Recommended
Offered each Spring Semester

Continuation of Biostatistics I. Topics include statistical methods for categorical data, regression and correlation, and analysis of variance.
3
20261Clinical Trials Design
Strongly Recommended
Offered each Fall Semester

This course is intended to introduce students to clinical trials methodology and to assist those who wish to evaluate and interpret published reports of trials. This course is focused on the design and development phases of the clinical trials, recruitment techniques, data collection and data quality issues, assessment of adverse effects, participant adherence, data monitoring, sample size requirements, techniques of survival analysis, reporting and interpretation of results, and multi-site studies.
1
20240Translational Genetics
Strongly Recommended
Offered each Fall Semester

The primary goal of this course is to teach students how to develop a research program utilizing the molecular genetics toolbox to ask genetic questions in the clinical setting. To this end, students will be provided with background in molecular genetics strategies and study designs as well as an understanding of common genetics questions emanating from the clinic so that they will be better able to make connections between bench and bedside. In addition, they will be challenged to think creatively and through a translational focus during course-long case studies and group projects.
2

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Electives for Concentration in Commercial Development of Drugs, Biologics, Devices and Diagnostics

For more details about the following courses, please contact:
Dr. Joe Hill
Email

IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
20242AModels of Disease and Drug Discovery
This course covers the concepts involved in developing disease models in the laboratory, and using these model systems to identify candidate drugs that will eventually be developed for therapy in the clinic. Topics covered include current stem cell culture and animal models used to study human diseases, computational screening approaches for designing and identifying small molecules in drug discovery, and the steps involved in taking a drug from the bench to the clinic. Specifically, models for human disease ranging from stem cells to small animal (zebrafish) to large animal (sheep) for biomedical research will be discussed. Course material will cover techniques for drug screening, platforms developed by companies and academics to screen drugs and steps involved in the drug discovery process. It is anticipated that advantages and disadvantages of each model system will be discussed followed by the practical aspects of designing screens for small molecules using these model systems. At the end of the 9 weeks duration of the course, each student is expected to prepare a report that will outline the logical progression of identifying a small molecule against a target of student’s interest, and to make it a commercial drug for clinical use.
1
14211Biomedical Technology Standards and Regulations
An overview of standards and regulations that impact the development, acquisition, and management of healthcare technologies. International technical standards, such as those promulgated by ISO and IEC, are important factors in product design and user acceptance. Consensus technical standards are also reiterated in federal regulations that cover the medical manufacture and distribution of medical devices and indirectly regulate their use, including the practice of medicine in healthcare facilities. In order for their organizations to compete, technology managers need to understand the regulatory paths to U.S. and international markets. Likewise, reimbursement standards and regulations affect medical technologies at all stages of maturation, from prototype development, through testing, marketing, customer use and into obsolescence. This course examines how these standards and regulations affect technology viewed from different perspectives based on what a technology is (e.g., physical device or drug, information and knowledge) and what technology causes in the adopting organizations (e.g., change, new processes).
2
20250Fundamentals of Intellectual Property
Strongly Recommended
This course surveys the principles of intellectual property (IP) and how IP is generated and leveraged to promote the development of new drugs, diagnostic tests, and medical devices. Students will examine various ways IP is codified and protected through the use of patents and copyrights. Students will also become familiar with the various agreements that impact on IP rights in the context of clinical and translational research. These agreements include confidentiality agreements, clinical trial and sponsored research agreements, collaborative research and development agreements (CRADAs), consulting agreements, material transfer agreements, and license agreements.
1

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Elective MCW Healthcare Technologies Courses
IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
14212Ethics of Technology Utilization
Ethics applied to the utilization and management of health-care technologies in a patient-care setting, including topics such as beneficence, nonmaleficence, quality-cost, resource allocation and personal-public conflicts, technology diffusion models and controls, clinical research and research integrity, and patient rights and confidentiality.
1.5
TBDRegulations Controlling Clinical and Translational Research
This course covers government, hospital and other rules and regulations affecting clinical and translational research. Topics include IRBs, informed consent, HIPAA, FDA with emphasis on physician and commercial INDs, animal protocols, cGMP, and cGLP. As part of the course students will complete a mock (or real) IRB submission or animal protocol.
2
14230AProduct Development of Medical Devices
Activities required for the design, development, and commercialization of new medical devices. Design, testing, regulatory, and legal requirements will be presented along with project evaluation and management methods. Issues involving management of the product development process will be discussed.
2
14298BSeminars in Drug and Device Development
(1 per semester). Seminar in drug and device development
2

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Additional Electives offered through Marquette University


IDCourse Name / DescriptionCredits
ENTP 6110*New Venture Formation
This case-based course focuses on starting and developing new ventures. Topics include: recognizing opportunity; selecting and dealing with partners; alternatives for financing startups; new venture sales issues; harvesting value for the entrepreneur; relationship with investors; and some legal/organizational topics important to entrepreneurs. Emphasis is placed on business model to analysis as the foundation for the new venture process. Students will be exposed to a range of visiting entrepreneurs and investors from the region and across the U.S. Prerequisites: Admitted to the graduate ACCO, BUAD, ECON, ENMA, HCTM, HURE or NURS program; FINA 6100; or cons. of M.B.A. Program Director
1-3
BUAD 262*Organizational Behavior
This course covers the analysis of the intersection of the administrative process and the organization in attaining goals in various environments. The course also examines the determinants of group and organizational performance, with consideration given to the intergroup processes, complex organizational processes and the behavioral consequences of organizational structure.
3
HCTM 200*Survey of Biomedical Engineering Technology
Review of technologies employed in medicine for diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of chronic and acute diseases, as well as hospital support. The goal of the course is to familiarize students with the operating principles, economic aspects, and purposes of healthcare technologies in clinical care.
3
HEAL 240*Environment of Healthcare Delivery
Review of current models for healthcare delivery (e.g. fee for service, modified fee for service, managed care, capitated care, IPOs, HMOs), and the ascendancy/ descendency of various models in different geographic regions and in response to economic incentives.
2
14210Biomedical Technology Assessment
This course serves as an introduction to healthcare technology assessment methods for hospital systems and medical businesses encompassing technical, clinical and business elements. Topics include clinical results analysis, gold standard comparison, Blank-Altman analysis, sensitivity/specificity analysis and business tradeoff analysis. Case studies of present and developing medical technologies are extensively used as examples of applied assessment methodologies.
3
ENTP 6115*Growth Strategies for Entrepreneurial Companies
This course focuses on growing and developing entrepreneurial ventures. Topics include: financing growth and managing investors; management capability as businesses grow (and change); cultural issues associated with entrepreneurial growth implementations; adaptation of strategy to change, both short and long term, and harvesting strategies for business owners. Students will interview entrepreneurs, develop operational plans, interview potential resource providers and write self-assessments as part of the course. Prerequisites: Admitted to the graduate ACCO, BUAD, ECON, ENMA, HCTM, HURE or NURS program; ACCO 6000, MANA 6000 and 6001; or cons. of M.B.A. Program Director.
3
ENTP 6180*Entrepreneurial Finance
Focuses on the financial aspects of entrepreneurship, from the first decision as to whether or not to undertake an activity, to projecting financial needs, reviewing the trade-offs between alternative financing choices, to harvesting. Topics will include, but are not limited to: bootstrapping, the role of angel investors, private placements, venture capital, banking options, commercial financing, public offers (IPOs, PIPES), factoring franchising and joint ventures. Prerequisites: Admitted to the graduate ACCO, BUAD, ECON, ENMA, HCTM, HURE or NURS program and FINA 6100; or cons. of M.B.A. Program Director.
3
BUAD 250*Financial Management
This course covers the application of financial theory and advanced techniques to the managerial decisions of the business firm. Topical coverage includes the areas of risk, valuation, capital structure, mergers and acquisitions, investment decisions and international finance.
3
BUAD 202*Accounting Foundations
This course emphasizes external reporting to stockholders, government, and other outside parties. Topics include measurement of income and expenses and the valuation of assets and equities, under various forms of business organizations, and structuring data to aid management decisions.
2
BUAD 230*Managerial Accounting
This course emphasizes the role of the accounting system as a quantitative information system. Available data are restructured in the form of internal reports to management for use in planning and controlling routine operations as well as in making non-routine decisions and formulating major plans and policies. The analysis of data makes use of regression analysis, matrix algebra and linear programming.
3
ENMA 6060*Innovation and Technology
This course explores the use of technologies such as data mining, neural networks, genetic algorithms and public resource computing to improve and accelerate innovation, entrepreneurship, and general human decision making processes. Provides current and perspective managers with an overview of how these technologies can be applied to generate better, faster and cheaper products, processes, and decisions. Student projects apply these technologies to the development and/or improvement of real-world analysis and decision-making processes.
3
ENMA 6090*New Product-Process Portfolio Management
Course description TBD
3
BUAD 240*Marketing Management
This course involves an integrated approach to marketing from a managerial point of view. Topics include, making use of economic, quantitative and behavioral concepts in analyzing and developing a framework for decision making and implementation of a firm’s marketing program.
3


* Indicates Marquette University course number. All Marquette University courses require an off-campus registration course procedure.

For more information on registering at other schools, students should contact the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences at cschaefer@mcw.edu or 414.955.8218.

See the Graduate School Handbook

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Students
Mary Bausch-Jurken

Mary Bausch-Jurken

Preetha Kurudiyara

Preetha Kurudiyara

Shawn Leming

Shawn Leming

Mamatha Pinninti

Mamatha Pinninti

Stephanie Zellner

Stephanie Zellner

Graduate Seminar Presentations

Selected MS in Clinical and Translational Science Program Graduate Seminars are displayed below.

Do Our Parents Make Us Fat? The Genetics of Obesity

Presented by: Michael Olivier, PhD
October 11, 2012

Population Health: A Framework for Understanding and Addressing the Health of Communities

Presented by: Ron Cisler, PhD, MS
October 18, 2012 – Graduate Seminar

Translation of Basic Biology to Develop New and Safer Treatments for Hemophilia

Presented by: Gilbert C. White, II, MD
October 25, 2012

Contact Us

Contact Us

Jane M. Kotchen, MD, MPH
Program Director
(414) 955-8201 / Email

Memory Bacon
Program Manager
(414) 955-8762 / Email

NIH Funding Acknowledgment: Important Reminder - Please acknowledge the NIH when publishing papers, patents, projects, and presentations resulting from the use of CTSI resources by including the NIH Funding Acknowledgement.
PARTNERS
Zablocki VA Medical CenterFroedtert HospitalMedical College of Wisconsin Childrens Hospital of WisconsinBloodCenter of WisconsinUniversity of Wisconsin - MilwaukeeMarquette UniversityMilwaukee School of Engineering